434(4): Unification of General Relativity and Quantum Mechanics with m Theory

434(4): Unification of General Relativity and Quantum Mechanics with m Theory

To Horst: Yes, note 434(5) should have been 434(4). To Gareth: The unification of general relativity and quantum mechanics in Eqs. (25) and (26) of Note 434(4) means that any particle in m space is also a wave in m space. The use of t1 and r1 in the Schroedinger quantization means that new wave / particles are produced by m space itself, because more energy levels and momentum levels are created. In the limit m(r) = 1 the well known de Broglie Einstein equations of special relativity are recovered. These are E = h bar omega = gamma m c squared and p =h bar kappa = gamma m v. In m theory the single energy level and momentum level are accompanied by n more levels, depending on the choice of m (r). The unification of general relativity and quantum mechanics opens the way to a vast number of possibilities which overturn the standard model in many ways. In the old physics m(r) is restricted to 1 – r0 / r but in the new physics m(r) can be any function.

434(4): Unification of General Relativity and Quantum Mechanics with m Theory

This note is numbered 434(5). Is there a 434(4) missing?

Horst

Am 19.03.2019 um 10:01 schrieb Myron Evans:

434(4): Unification of General Relativity and Quantum Mechanics with m Theory

The unification is achieved with the de Broglie / Einstein equations in m space, Eqs. (25) and (26). One of many consequencies is that the synthesis of photons with mass and particles results as a consequence of the m space and m(r) function, defined by the infinitesimal line element (1). So this is an explanation of why so many elementary particles can be observed. In early UFT papers this type of unification was achieved using the ECE wave equation and the tetrad postulate. The standard model has failed to provide any satisfactory unification of this type. The existence of the photon with mass was proven from the inverse Faraday effect in 1991, through the B(3) field, nominated several times for a Nobel Prize, and recognized with a Civil List Pension.

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