Archive for May, 2011

Euler Resonance with general torque

Feed: Dr. Myron Evans
Posted on: Friday, May 20, 2011 3:05 AM
Author: metric345
Subject: Euler Resonance with general torque

It is already clear that Euler resonance will occur with any type of torque between an electromagnetic field and material matter. This is an important point in realizing that the Kurata / B(3) technology works for any kind of waste oil or waste plastic and so on, and makes fuel out of sea water, with many other technologies round the corner. If there is no permanent electric or magnetic dipole there may be an induced electric or magnetic dipole caused by electric and magnetic polarizability and hyperpolarizabilities of any order. The B(3) field interacts with any kind of matter through an electric electric magnetic hyperpolarizability, the inverse Faraday effect. This is a small effect, but UFT 183 shows how it may be amplified greatly by a catalyst. The catalyst designs were developed by Kurata and colleagues. The dipoles or induced dipoles set up a torque with the E(1) = E(2)*and B(1) = B(2)* fields of the circularly polarized light. Linearly polarized light is 50 % right and 50% left circularly polarized light. Torques can also be set up with quadrupoles, octopoles and hexadecapoles, or n poles, n of any order. These days any kind of torque can be computer simulated in a nanometre mould, and the results animated. It should be possible to simulate and animate the dissociation.

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183(2): Details of Resonant Dissociation

Feed: Dr. Myron Evans
Posted on: Friday, May 20, 2011 2:45 AM
Author: metric345
Subject: 183(2): Details of Resonant Dissociation

These are details of resonant dissociation by circularly polarized light when a molecule contains a permanent electric dipole moment. This type of torque is animated in the award winning Evans / Pelkie animation of the early nineties on this site. The animation was produced from computer simulation code and shows the spinning effect very clearly. The extra ingredient in UFT 183 is Euler Bernoulli resonance defined by condition (27), when an angular frequency of the light is tuned to a characteristic angular frequency of a catalyst in a nanometre mould. In hydrocarbons the permanent electric and magnetic dipole moments are usually small, but there is a B(3) mechanism of resonance which will be developed in the next note. The B(3) mechanism induces a magnetic dipole moment in the inverse Faraday effect, and there is a torque between the induced magnetic dipole moment and the B(1) = B(2)* magnetic field of the circularly polarized light. I computer simulated this type of torque at the University of Zurich in the early nineties on the ETH IBM 3090 supercomputer (see Omnia Opera). Light contains many frequencies, so there are many resonance frequencies. More generally there will be a Langevin friction term (and a continued fraction of memory functions) and stochastic torque, giving a planar itinerant oscillator theory and barrier crossing theory. However this simple frictionless theory without stochastic torque is enough to show clearly how light can dissociate waste oil hydrocarbon structures in the Kurata / B(3) mechanism. The dissociated fragments are then recombined using controlling catalysts to give useful products such as clean burning diesel. In hydrocarbons the whole process is controlled by B(3), the spin carrier.

a183rdpapernotes2.pdf

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UFT 183: Some Possible Mechanisms

Feed: Dr. Myron Evans
Posted on: Wednesday, May 18, 2011 7:57 AM
Author: metric345
Subject: UFT 183: Some Possible Mechanisms

B(3) Productive Energy Research Institute

The following torques are familiar to me from field applied molecular dynamics computer simulation, in which the field was coded into the forces loop. Each torque type can be amplified by the resonance mechanism sent over in note 183(1). In each case the laser is circularly polarized and spins the ion or molecule. This can be seen in the animation with Chris Pelkie made at Cornell Theory Center from simulation code.

1) Torque between the permanent electric dipole and E(1) = E(2)*.
2) Permanent magnetic dipole and B(1) = B(2)*
3) B(3) induced magnetic dipole moment and B(1) = B(2)*

The circularly polarized light causes torques of various kinds, and the ion or molecule is spun. The catalyst causes this spin to be amplified by Euler resonance and this causes dissociation by centrifugal forces breaking bonds. This is one class of basic mechanisms. All ions will have a permanent electric dipole moment with which E(1) = E(2)* interacts directly. That is the strongest or dominant mechanism That mechanism causes rotation as in the animation on www.aias.us with Chris Pelkie of Cornell Theory Center. The B(3) mechanism is (3) above. This is the dominant mechanism when there is no permanent electric or magnetic dipole moment. These days such mechanisms could be set up and simulated / animated in various catalysts with Monte Carlo or molecular dynamics.

Congratulations once again on your work!

Myron Evans
Britsh Civil List
www.aias.us

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B(3) is a radiated field

Feed: Dr. Myron Evans
Posted on: Wednesday, May 18, 2011 5:43 AM
Author: metric345
Subject: B(3) is a radiated field

This basic fact is important to keep in mind. The B(3) field interacts with matter (one electron for example) through the conjugate product. It is not a conventional static magnetic field, it propagates with the Piekara Kielich conjugate product. In ECE theory it is part of the spin connection term in

F = d ^ A + omega ^ A

In the standard model:

F = d ^ A

and B(3) does not exist in the standard model because omega is zero in the Maxwell Heaviside theory ((U(1) gauge invariant theory).

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183(1): Resonant Amplification of Electromagnetically Induced Torque

Feed: Dr. Myron Evans
Posted on: Wednesday, May 18, 2011 5:20 AM
Author: metric345
Subject: 183(1): Resonant Amplification of Electromagnetically Induced Torque

This is a mechanism for resonant amplification of electromagnetically induced torque when a natural angular frequency of the catalyst is tuned to a natural angular frequency of the e / m radiation. This note starts with the strongest, simplest and most direct mechanism, the torque between the electric field of circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation, and a permanent electric dipole moment, simulated and animated by Pelkie and myself on www.aias.us. The extra ingredient here is dissociation by resonance, when the molecule or ion spins itself apart. The torque caused by the B(3) field is that between the magnetic dipole moment induced by the B(3) field and the B(1) = B(2)* component of the electromagnetic field. So UFT 183 will develop these various mechanisms. They are the theoretical basis of the Kurata dissociation process.

a183rdpapernotes1.pdf

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Literature Search on Photodissociation

Feed: Dr. Myron Evans
Posted on: Thursday, May 12, 2011 12:27 AM
Author: metric345
Subject: Literature Search on Photodissociation

There has been a lot of work on polarized atoms and molecules in photodissociation. For example:

www.ccp6.ac.uk/booklets/CCP6-2005_vector_correlations.pdf

On page 9 for example it is described how circularly polarized light pumps the m = – 1/2 ground state of rubidium into the m = 1/2 state. This is a transfer of angular momentum. In the standard model there are only two states of angular momentum, right and left, because of zero photon mass, but in the ECE theory the angular momentum also has a longitudinal component. Polarized atoms can be prepared by pulsed laser preparation. Google literature searching is now as good as any big library, so using this method I found that the inverse Faraday effect and the B(3) field have been observed on the sub femtosecond level in a magnetic liquid and reported by a group from China. So it is quite easy to see how B(3) and angular momentum is at work in photodissociation processes, but it is much more difficult to achieve what Kurata has demonstrated experimentally and industrially. The inverse Faraday effect is routine by now.

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